Tag Archives: US Bank

Take a Point, Leave a Point! Share your Leftover FlexPoints to Help Other Travel Hackers

Good afternoon everyone.  As you probably know, beginning on January 1, 2018, FlexPoints will be worth a fixed 1.5 cents per point (CPP) down from their current value of up to 2.0 CPP.  This is definitely a big blow to the US Bank FlexPerks Rewards program.  I’ve been a long time fan of the US Bank FlexPerks Rewards program and first got into the program when US Bank ran their 2014 Winter Olympics promo with an increased sign up bonus for their US Bank FlexPerks Travel Rewards Visa Signature Credit Card.  Since then, I’ve earned and redeemed 200,000+ FlexPoints over the last 3+ years.

Since I can get 1.5 CPP value with my new Chase Sapphire Reserve Credit Card and Chase Ultimate Reward Points are so much easier to rack up than US Bank FlexPoints, I have decided to liquidate my FlexPoints stash.  It is a sad day and an end to an era, but all good things must come to an end.  But there is good news!  I have decided to share my 4,793 leftover FlexPoints with my readers.

If you need between 1 and 4,793 FlexPoints to book a travel redemption (at the 20,000 or 30,000 FlexPoint threshold), please leave a comment with the number of FlexPoints you need.  After a few days, I will email each commenter, starting with the smallest FlexPoint request and ask for your FlexPerks account number.  I will then transfer the number of FlexPoints you need.  This is my small gift to my readers.

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US Bank Club Carlson Credit Card Holiday Shopping Targeted Spending Bonuses

Good morning everyone, I hope you all had a great weekend.  I had a great time at the wedding up in Placerville, CA (outside Sacramento and close to where the California Gold Rush started in Coloma at Sutter’s Mill).  Speaking of gold… let’s talk about Club Carlson Gold Points :) When I returned home, I received the following letter regarding my US Bank Club Carlson Visa Signature Credit Card.  I have a pathetic targeted spending offer: Earn 5,000 bonus Club Carlson points for spending $5,050 between November 1 and December 31.

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1,500 FlexPoints or 2,500 Club Carlson Points for Setting Up Automatic Payments

Good afternoon everyone.  Yesterday afternoon, I received 2 promotional emails from US Bank to receive FlexPoints and Club Carlson points for setting up an automatic payment and paying with a specific US Bank credit cards.  The promotional emails came from US Bank (1800USBanks@email.usbank.com) with the subject line “Act now and earn 1,500 FlexPoints” and “Act now and earn 2,500 bonus points.” Here is what the emails look like.  If you have other US Bank credit cards, you may have received a similar offer.  Please share your offers in the comments.

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PSA: Error Transferring US Bank FlexPoints from FlexPerks Rewards Account to Altitude Reserve Account? Just Call

Good afternoon everyone, I have a quick tip to share regarding transferring US Bank FlexPoints from a FlexPerks Rewards account to an Altitude Reserve account.  My friend was trying to book a flight with his FlexPoints from his US Bank Altitude Reserve Credit Card, but he was short a few FlexPoints.  I had a few extra FlexPoints in my account, so I told him I would transfer the FlexPoints to his account.  I recently wrote about the New US Bank FlexPerks Transfer Process (Share & Combine US Bank FlexPoints), so I thought the process would be simple.  He sent me his Altitude Reserve account number and Altitude Reserve credit card number and I tried to make the transfer online, but I kept getting an error message. He also has a traditional FlexPerks Rewards credit card, so I tried to send him FlexPoints to his FlexPerks Rewards account, but I kept getting an error message there too.

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My 8 Credit Card App-O-Rama Results (Mostly Bad News)

Good morning everyone, I hope you all has a great weekend.  A few weeks ago, I applied for 8 new credit cards during my App-O-Rama.  Here are the 8 credit cards and sign up bonuses that I applied for (not in this particular order).  Unfortunately, my App-O-Rama skills are not as good as they used to be and I was (ultimately) declined for most of these credit cards.

  • Bank of America Alaska Airlines Visa Signature Credit Card: 30,000 AS Miles + $100 statement credit after spending $1,000 in 3 months ($75 annual fee)
  • Bank of America Virgin Atlantic Credit Card: 75,000 VA Miles after spending $12,000 in 6 months ($90 annual fee)
  • Bank of America Amtrak Rewards Credit Card: 30,000 Amtrak Points after spending $1,000 in 3 months ($79 annual fee)
  • US Bank Altitude Reserve Credit Card: 50,000 FlexPoints ($750 in travel credit) after spending $4,500 in 3 months ($400 annual fee)
  • Wells Fargo Visa Signature Credit Card: 20,000 Go Far Reward Points after spending $1,000 in 3 months ($0 annual fee)
  • First Bankcard Best Western Credit Card: 50,000 Points after spending $1,000 in 3 months ($59 annual fee, first year waived)
  • Synchrony Bank Cathay Pacific Credit Card: 50,000 CX Miles after spending $2,500 in 3 months ($95 annual fee)
  • Barclays Wyndham Rewards Credit Card: 45,000 Wyndham Points (3 free nights) after spending $2,000 in 3 months ($75 annual fee)

Long story short, I applied for 3 Bank of America credit cards, starting with the Bank of America Alaska Airlines Visa Signature Credit Card.  I recently closed my previous Bank of America Alaska Airlines Visa Signature Credit Card a few weeks ago, so I was ready to apply again and earn more Alaska Airlines miles.  Unfortunately, my application went to pending.  Since I was not immediately declined, I decided to apply for a Bank of America Virgin Atlantic Credit Card.  Surprisingly, I was instantly approved for that credit card with a pretty small credit limit.  With that success, I decided to apply for a Bank of America Amtrak Rewards Credit Card.  Unfortunately, that application went to pending as well. 1 out of 3 instant approvals was not bad.  I was hopeful that the 2 pending applications could be approved with a short reconsideration call.

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