Tag Archives: Uber

us-bank-cash-plus-credit-card-long-logo

US Bank Cash Plus Credit Card Adds Ground Transportation (Including Uber & Lyft) to Q2 5% Cash Back Categories

Good afternoon everyone, I have another short post to share before you start your weekend.  If you have the US Bank Cash Plus (Cash+) Credit Card, you can now select your Q2 bonus categories.  I did this yesterday and noticed the new 5% ground transportation category.  This is great timing because both the Chase Freedom Credit Card and Discover It Credit Card offer 5% cash back for public transportation (including Uber & Lyft) for Q1, but not for Q2.  By the way, the Citi Dividend Credit Card is offering 5% cash back at drugstores and fitness clubs in Q2.  Time to stock up on “cold medicine.”

US Bank Cash Plus Categories

Continue reading

south-america-continent-long-logo

A Cheap Day in Bogota, Colombia (Monserrat, Funicular, Roasted Corn & Uber Rides)

Good morning everyone, I hope you all had a great weekend.  Before I go on, I wanted to give a quick shoutout to all the people who attended my SF Travel Hackers weekend meetup in SF on Saturday – it was great to talk to all of you.  This post is the second trip report from my recent South American trip (part 1: Aloft Bogota Colombia Airport Hotel Review (SPG Category 1 + Free Airport Shuttle)).  In this post, I will show you how cheap things are in Bogota, Colombia.  The current exchange rate as of February 13 is 1 US Dollar = 2,878 Colombian Pesos (You can round up to 3,000 to make the math simpler in your head).

1 USD to Colombian Peso

During our time in Bogota, we took 2 Uber rides.  The first ride was from the Aloft Bogota Hotel to Montserrat (one of the highest peaks in the city with a great view of the city) and the second from somewhere in town back to our hotel.  The first Uber ride was 12,300 Colombian Pesos (~$4.27 for a 35 minute Uber ride) and second Uber ride was 11,000 Colombian Pesos (~$3.82 for a 19 minute ride).

Continue reading

uber-long-logo

Part 3: Interview with a Professional Uber/Lyft Driver – Driver Turnover, International Expansion & Profitability

Part 1: Interview with a Professional Uber/Lyft Driver – Tipping, Surge Pricing & More

Part 2: Interview with a Professional Uber/Lyft Driver – How Much Money do Drivers Earn?


I first met Harry Campbell back in August 2014, long before he was the ride-sharing guy. His first web presence was at www.yourpfpro.com, a financial website for young professionals. And as it turned out, Harry is also a miles and points guy, so we’ve stayed in touch ever since.

Then a few years ago, he turned his time and attention to his new brand, TheRideShareGuy.com. Maybe you’ve heard of him or seen his blog/podcast/Youtube channel. He’s my go-to resource when I have ride-share questions, so I wanted to sit down with him and get his view as both an insider, because he still drives for both Uber and Lyft, and also as a mentor and resource for drivers.

I asked Harry some tough questions, because as a consumer, there’s a lot about the ride-sharing world I’d like to understand. I want, as I’m sure you do, to have the best possible ride-sharing experience, and understanding this from both a passenger as well as a driver perspective helps! Harry’s got a unique window into the sharing economy, so let’s see what he has to say.

Shelli: Is there an over-saturation of drivers (in certain places of course)? Is this why Uber/Lyft can keep cutting back on how much drivers earn?

Harry: Both Uber and Lyft cut rates almost annually on drivers, but they don’t really give very convincing reasons why. They say lower rates will bring drivers more money, but we have not seen evidence for that. Over-saturation of drivers is definitely an issue, but so is Uber’s burn rate of drivers.  In 2015, Uber announced nearly half of its drivers quit after one year, but so far it doesn’t look like as though the pool of drivers will let up. Flexibility and the ability to earn money on your own time is tempting for a lot of people, even though Uber and Lyft cut rates. Continue reading

uber-long-logo

Part 2: Interview with a Professional Uber/Lyft Driver – How Much Money do Drivers Earn?

Part 1: Interview with a Professional Uber/Lyft Driver – Tipping, Surge Pricing & More


I first met Harry Campbell back in August 2014, long before he was the ride-sharing guy. His first web presence was at www.yourpfpro.com, a financial website for young professionals. And as it turned out, Harry is also a miles and points guy, so we’ve stayed in touch ever since.

Then a few years ago, he turned his time and attention to his new brand, TheRideShareGuy.com. Maybe you’ve heard of him or seen his blog/podcast/Youtube channel. He’s my go-to resource when I have ride-share questions, so I wanted to sit down with him and get his view as both an insider, because he still drives for both Uber and Lyft, and also as a mentor and resource for drivers.

I asked Harry some tough questions, because as a consumer, there’s a lot about the ride-sharing world I’d like to understand. I want, as I’m sure you do, to have the best possible ride-sharing experience, and understanding this from both a passenger as well as a driver perspective helps! Harry’s got a unique window into the sharing economy, so let’s see what he has to say.

Shelli: I’ve been curious about who drives for Uber/Lyft. In 2015, your course came out. Who’s your typical student? Driving, regardless for which company, seems like one of those things that people do thinking, “Well, I drive, why not drive others around for money?” Yet, all jobs require a certain amount of training and basic knowledge. Have you approached Uber/Lyft to provide a certain payback to the drivers if they take the course, sorta like a professional development benefit? It would seem that drivers who invest in a course would be more committed to the work.

Harry: Our typical student is a new driver, someone just starting out, but also people who have been driving a little while and want to grow their business. These are people who see driving as just one of many ways to make money on a flexible schedule, and they want to learn how to maximize their driving so they have free time for other pursuits (monetary, usually, but it could also be personal pursuits).

My course was really created to help people maximize their earnings, not necessarily get a payback from Lyft or Uber to certify professional development. There are classes out there that are more geared to teaching people how to be a good driver and how to improve the passenger experience. Our course is for people who already pretty much know those basics and want to take it to the next level. Continue reading

uber-long-logo

Part 1: Interview with a Professional Uber/Lyft Driver – Tipping, Surge Pricing & More

I first met Harry Campbell back in August 2014, long before he was the ride-sharing guy. His first web presence was at www.yourpfpro.com, a financial website for young professionals. And as it turned out, Harry is also a miles and points guy, so we’ve stayed in touch ever since.

Then a few years ago, he turned his time and attention to his new brand, TheRideShareGuy.com. Maybe you’ve heard of him or seen his blog/podcast/Youtube channel. He’s my go-to resource when I have ride-share questions, so I wanted to sit down with him and get his view as both an insider, because he still drives for both Uber and Lyft, and also as a mentor and resource for drivers.

I asked Harry some tough questions, because as a consumer, there’s a lot about the ride-sharing world I’d like to understand. I want, as I’m sure you do, to have the best possible ride-sharing experience, and understanding this from both a passenger as well as a driver perspective helps! Harry’s got a unique window into the sharing economy, so let’s see what he has to say.

Shelli: Is there an expectation amongst drivers that driving is a way to meet friends? There have been many stories about people who feel like drivers butt into conversations or try too hard to buddy up to passengers. Maybe for tips?? Even Ben over at OMAAT wrote about this being his number one Uber pet peeve.

Harry: I wouldn’t say rideshare driving is necessarily for making friends, but there is certainly a community of rideshare drivers out there who talk on Facebook or have their own local group meetups to “talk shop.” Being part of a community is something we actually encourage rideshare drivers to do, because it’s helpful to talk to people who know exactly what you’re going through.

Overall, what we recommend at TheRideShareGuy.com is for a driver to read their passenger though. Are they texting on their cellphone, not making eye contact, or stressed about getting somewhere? That might be a driver’s cue to be a little more relaxed, maybe not ask a lot of questions. On the other hand, if the person asks for tips about where to eat (if they’re visiting that city) or places to go, we definitely encourage drivers to chat and help a passenger out. After all, ratings are a pretty big deal, and being helpful to passengers is good for drivers’ bottom line, particularly if they’re driving on Lyft and get a tip!

Finally, sometimes it really pays off for drivers to be aware of what their passengers are saying. We definitely recommend drivers get dash cams, but on top of that: be aware. There was just a story about a driver rescuing a teen from pimps all because he listened to what the pimps were saying in the car. Continue reading